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Curt Works For Screw, 1979-81

Diddler on the Roof (Al Goldstein), Screw, December 28, 1981
"Diddler on the Roof" (Al Goldstein), Screw, December 28, 1981
Singer Linda Ronstadt, Governor Jerry Brown, and Ronald Reagan, Screw, c. 1980
Singer Linda Ronstadt, Governor Jerry Brown, and Ronald Reagan, Screw, c. 1980
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Canadian First Lady Margaret Trudeau, Screw, c. 1980
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Canadian First Lady Margaret Trudeau, Screw, c. 1980
Rupert Murdoch and NY Post Gossip Columnist Claudia Cohen, Screw, c. 1980
Rupert Murdoch and NY Post Gossip Columnist Claudia Cohen, Screw, c. 1980
Eleanor Roosevelt Three Dollar Bill, airbrush and collage on illustration board (for Screw centerfold), 1980
Eleanor Roosevelt Three Dollar Bill, airbrush and collage on illustration board (for Screw centerfold), 1980

Miracle on 42nd Street, Screw, October 8, 1979

Miracle on 42nd Street, Screw, October 8, 1979
His Holiness consecrates the sacred flake under the approving gaze of Studio 54 co-owner Ian Schrager (no longer visible here).
His Holiness consecrates the sacred flake under the approving gaze of Studio 54 co-owner Ian Schrager (no longer visible here).
The Holy Father signals his approval of NYC's New Wave haven <i>CBGB</i> after catching American debut of Vatican-based rock band, The Flying Castrati.
The Holy Father signals his approval of NYC's New Wave haven CBGB after catching American debut of Vatican-based rock band, The Flying Castrati.
Pope John Paul at the Ramrod bar
"Cute boychicks, yes," said His Eminence after quickie sidetrip to the landmark Ramrod bar, "but iss worst food I'm havink since the Diet of Worms."
Pope John Paul at Studio 54
His Eminence takes time out to absolve surprise Studio 54 guest David Berkowitz of his misogynistic sins. "But, you are not to be lettink it happen again!" he warned. "And that's a holy order!"
Pope John Paul with Rod Stewart
John Paul joins rocker Rod Stewart for an impromptu rendition of "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy?" Later, His Eminence demonstrated the Vatican Hustle, a dance of his own invention that's a cinch to catch on big here.

I will always associate Curt's work for Screw with our "Paparazzi Self- Portraits." It was the portrait of Curt with Al Goldstein that got Curt the job at Screw; and many of his first illustrations for the paper were inspired by the way we had used famous people and unlikely juxtapositions in the "Paparazzi Self-Portrait" series. Our pictures, however, recorded actual moments and were always polite if not admiring; Curt's Screw centerfolds in contrast were contrived, painted pastiches that deliberately aimed to offend. The prolific Curt quickly established himself as one of Screw’s leading artists, taking his place alongside Robert Crumb, Vaughn Bode, Kim Deitch and others underground cartoonists from the 1960s who had also done worked for Al. Curt's provocative, humorous and topical illustrations always soared above their commercial context. They were in truth inspired examples of "Punk Art," and as such they were exhibited in "New York / New Wave," an important 1981 exhibition at the trendy art space PS 1.